Kathleen_Talbot Kathleen Talbot knows the true environmental cost of fashion.

Kathleen Talbot: “We want to prove that sustainable clothing can still be fashionable, fun, and even irreverent”

As VP of sustainability and operations at LA based brand Reformation, Kathleen Talbot is leading their efforts of trying to “clean up” the industry by introducing fashion with a much lower—and precisely calculated—environmental impact.

“There’s a growing conversation about the impact that fashion has on the environment and on people around the world. Sustainable fashion is quickly going from niche to best practice, and I feel really optimistic about the future we’ll create together. As a sustainable, mission-driven brand, Reformation is embracing the challenge to engage in this movement, and keep pushing for transformational changes in how we make clothes.

Fashion is the third-largest polluting industry in the world. We want to be a part of solutions to clean that up, whether that’s helping to develop new closed-loop fibers, or innovating more-efficient dye practices. We’re seeing brands big and small take a serious look at more sustainable supply chains, and thankfully that’s making more of these innovations available.

« At Reformation, our sustainable factory and ethical manufacturing is more than "made in the U.S.A."—it's about opportunity, dignity, and truly fair work »

They say you can’t manage what you don’t measure. So we’ll continue to refine and expand our RefScale tool and our sustainability report to make sure we’re counting the true costs of fashion that matter—including carbon, water and waste—and holding ourselves to be better and better. We want to encourage the use of these types of standards and certifications, so as an industry we’re tackling the parts of our businesses that will create the biggest impact.

The most powerful thing about the sustainable fashion movement is illuminating the people (and work conditions) behind our clothes. At Reformation, our sustainable factory and ethical manufacturing is more than “made in the U.S.A.”—it’s about opportunity, dignity, and truly fair work. I think consumers are demanding that more and more, and we’ll see brands respond with greater transparency about how clothes are made.

We want to prove that sustainable clothing can still be fashionable, fun, and even irreverent. We want to continue to talk about the true costs associated with fashion with our customers and give them simple, achievable ways to make real changes—whether it’s using their mighty dollar to support their values, or line-drying. Over 80% of the impact of Reformation’s clothes happens when they’re in our customer’s hands, depending on how they wash, care, and dispose of their stuff. We’ll only truly transform fashion if we can bring everyone along with us.”

Check out Reformation here!

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